Fancy Rabbit Dwarf-Hotot Breed History

Fancy Rabbit Dwarf-Hotot Breed History

Fancy Rabbit Dwarf-Hotot Breed History 

This breed of rabbit is a very small, chubby rabbit, completely white with an eight-inch black band around the eyes. His personality is characterized by being docile.

Fancy Rabbit Dwarf-Hotot Breed History

While it clearly looks like a Dutch dwarf, it is allowed an additional half pound for a maximum weight of 3 pounds. The ears should not be more than 2.75 “long to balance with the rest of the rabbit’s body.

History of the Dwarf-Hotot Rabbit Breed

In the 1970s, during the years when the Iron Curtain divided East and West Germany, breeders on both sides of the Wall independently embarked on missions to create small versions of Hotot’s White Rabbit.

In East Germany, a breeder started with a male Blanc de Hotot and miniaturized the offspring by mating it with a red-eyed white Netherland Dwarf. Repeated crossbreeding back to Dutch dwarves resulted in healthy and hardy Hotot Dwarf, but they were much larger than the typical Dutch dwarf.

History of the Dwarf-Hotot Rabbit Breed

In West Germany, the project began with the crossing of a black Netherland Dwarf with a red-eyed white Netherland Dwarf. This particular cross resulted in quasi-Dutch markings on the offspring. One of these hatchlings, a female, when interbred with its father, produced a tiny dwarf with dark bands on the eyes, but also color on the ears and back.

Together with other breeders, they finally achieved their goal – a Blanc de Hotot branded rabbit in true dwarf size. They reached the diminutive size, however, the rabbits lacked vigor and had reproductive problems.

The project somehow became known to breeders on both sides of the Wall. In 1979, groups of animals swapped sides. The mixing of the bloodlines did wonders for the breed, improving and standardizing the size and vigor of the rabbits.

Dwarf Hotot in the United States

Seven small Hotots purchased in West Germany were imported into the United States in 1980 by Mrs. Elizabeth Forstinger. Later he imported smaller Hotots from West and East Germany, which he raised wisely and slaughtered hard.

The acceptance process at the ARBA began in 1981 and was successfully completed in 1983. The American Dwarf Hotot Rabbit Club was also licensed by the ARBA in 1983 and is the national online presence for Dwarf-Hotot rabbit breeders throughout the U.S.

This breed is not recognized by the British Rabbit Council (BRC) of the United Kingdom.

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